Our War Memorials

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Our church contains two war memorials, commemorating the men who lost their lives in the first and second world wars.

The east window and baldacchino are first world war memorials and were installed in the church in 1923. They were designed by the Scottish architect and stained-glass artist, Sir John Ninian Comper. He is well known for his work in churches up and down the country, including stained glass at Westminster Abbey, where he is buried. The baldacchino is made from wood, and was originally painted white, but is now decorated with gold leaf. The baldacchino consists of four Tuscan columns supporting a canopy. On the underside of the canopy is a white dove, representing peace. The canopy is surmounted by two angels holding swords, the blades of which are in fact taper candles.

The glass in the east window, behind the baldacchino, was designed to fit into the existing tracery, replacing an earlier painted window. The lower panes depict risen Christ in the centre, beside St. Peter, the church’s patron saint, and Saints Mark, Paul and Aiden, representing the daughter churches of the parish. The upper panes depict Christ in majesty between St. Michael and St. George. There are also symbols representing the allied nations who fought alongside Britain in the first world war.

A memorial on the north wall of the chancel lists the names of the fallen, and reads:

“In Memory of
The Men of this Parish and of those
Who worshipped in this Church
And gave their lives in the Great War
1914-1918

GRANT THEM O LORD ETERNAL REST”

The oak screen that separates the Leeper Chapel from the nave is a second world war memorial. It was carved by Robert Thompson of Kilburn, a furniture maker well known for the carved mice on his pieces. He also made the nave altar and two pieces of furniture in the Leeper chapel, all of which feature a mouse. The screen was installed in the church in 1948, and has been inscribed with names of the fallen and the following:

“IN GRATEFUL MEMORY OF
MEMBERS OF THIS CHURCH
WHO GAVE THEIR LIVES
IN THE WAR
1939-1945”